Archive

QWIRE CD

No Comments

PLAY ALL…

1. Low Pressure Area
2. Miles
3. Miyar & Aideen
4. Local On
5. Synthphony

Qwire was:

Stanley Jungleib
Chromatonal, Fred Malouf http://www.chromatonal.com/
CCRMA, Chris Chafe https://ccrma.stanford.edu/~cc/CDs/topLevel.html
Ninestones, Barry Hall http://www.ninestones.com/

and on this recording, filling a big hole in our live shows, we were incredibly fortunate to secure the brilliant and historic drummer and percussionist, Muruga Booker.

Production by Fred, and Jay Kadis. Graphics by Barry.

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
1 qwire cover
98 w qwire p1
98 w qwire p2
sm-5596

QWIRE at Frost, Stanford

No Comments
NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
19940720 Qwire gig
940720 a band fest 1
940720 a band fest 2

Here is a one-hour video—grainy from Beta to VHS transfer—but direct from the board, so sounds great thanks to attentive mixing by Jay Kadis:

Satie Debuts at MUSIG

No Comments

Mikado DSP Board Planning

No Comments

Intel is a large OEM computer provider and needs to expand 386-based systems to at least meet MPC 1991 standards. Intended to provide the needed services, the Mikado was basically a DSP card based on a Texas Instruments TMS320C31. It’s minimum requirement was to be able to send and received faxes, and that code was being written. In November of 1991 Vice President Avram Miller noticed that among the other planned features there was no specification of how audio or synthesis would actually perform on the system.

Rather than Santa Clara, the impetus for my consulting actually came from Hillsboro, Oregon—location of the Intel Architecture Laboratory (IAL) and its strategists. My job became specifying what the Mikado audio and synthesizer system should do, and analyze in fact whether it could do it. Assuming the positive, then find a company to code it.

To aid in this research I enlisted three of my most experienced friends: Fred Malouf-a brilliant programmer and fine musician, Dave Smith of Sequential Circuits, and Chris Chafe from Stanford’s CCRMA. We met several times to discuss architecture and count the actual DSP instructions it would take to process different types of voice patches. At some point I went to TI itself to talk about the ‘C31. Pessimism began to set in; we all agreed it was only marginally powerful enough to emulate a Sound Blaster.

As significantly, DSP using the general-purpose industrial SPOX operating system was certainly not the means by which pro audio or synthesis was being done. “Everybody” used custom chips in some combination of analog and digital fashion. Software synthesis in professional audio was barely being explored; specifically in the Peavey DPM3. Fortunately, one of its designers was Scott Peer— also from Sequential and one of the genuinely nicest guys you are likely to meet. He contributed several insights which helped us tune our calculations. And he also set in motion an email that was lost for about sixths months, and when found created an amazing collaboration that profoundly maneuvered the convoluted path towards sealing the deal.

Planning began for me to go to Oregon and lay out the status and case for MIDI and synthesis. Very fortunately I had just completed a few years of service as Curriculum Director for the MIDI program at Cogswell College, thus had in hand all the lectures I needed, graphically-intensive and pre-tested in dozens of courses.

Stanford CCRMA in Keyboard Japan

No Comments

CCRMA in KEYBOARD

No Comments

1987.12 “Stanford’s Computer Music Lab.” Keyboard. (p 58)

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
8712 KYBD ART STNFRD CML SJ P01
8712 KYBD ART STNFRD CML SJ P02
8712 KYBD ART STNFRD CML SJ P03
8712 KYBD ART STNFRD CML SJ P04
8712 KYBD ART STNFRD CML SJ P05
8712 KYBD ART STNFRD CML SJ P06
8712 KYBD ART STNFRD CML SJ P07
8712 KYBD ART STNFRD CML SJ P08
8712 KYBD ART STNFRD CML SJ P09
8712 KYBD ART STNFRD CML SJ P10
 “You deserve to be proud of your article. It’s a fine piece of work. You’ve also done a great service to CCRMA. I just hope we can sustain the increased interest which is likely to result. Once again, nice work! It was a real treat to see CCRMA through your eyes.”— Julius O Smith

The truth is Ted Greenwald rewrote and enlivened a lot of it for their audience; something for which he later apologized through an intermediary whom I assured it was no problem. I didn’t mind what he did at all. It was good, purposeful editing. I was pleased to give Bill Schottstaedt more exposure; which he nevertheless eschews.

CCRMA Pla Cloud Code

No Comments

This code was for non-realtime software synthesis in Pla at CCRMA’s Sambox. Output was at least the tape used in Inner Film/Earth Sighs generated by this score. I explain he process more fully in the Keyboard article about CCRMA that followed.

In this session I met the remarkable Bill Scottstaedt, who guided my coding and from whom I also picked up wavesequencing and traveling loops (“Leviathin”) for Sequential; he former essentially creating the Wavestation.

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
870707 MP19[SUM,SAJ] PG1
870707 MP19[SUM,SAJ] PG2
870707 MP19[SUM,SAJ] PG3
870707 MP19[SUM,SAJ] PG4
870707 MP19[SUM,SAJ] PG5
870707 MP19[SUM,SAJ] PG6

CCRMA in Keyboard

No Comments
Blue Taste Theme created by Jabox